The Renaissance School

 
Nurturing Hearts & Minds

Teachers


Each classroom at the Renaissance School is staffed

by two experienced, certified preschool educators 

and one or two student interns

Student interns are often University of Massachusetts undergraduate students 
who are aspiring to become certified public school teachers, Pre-K - 2nd grade.

Renaissance educators believe that by placing children in small groups  
and providing a high teacher to child ratio, they are providing the best 
possible learning environment for young children. 

Educators meet daily to discuss children's progress and debrief the day

 Regular staff meetings provide time to plan and evaluate the curriculum
 

Educators at the Renaissance School work closely with parents to help
each child reach her fullest potential

All Renaissance staff submit to CORI background checks,

                                                   and many have First Aid & CPR training


About the Director…


  

Dorothy A. Meyer, C.A.G.S., M. Ed., has been working with young children and their families for more than thirty years. She is deeply committed to improving the quality of care and education for young children.  Dotty became a UMass 
faculty member in 1989, and was the master teacher/director of the university’s laboratory school for sixteen years prior
to opening the Renaissance School.  
Dotty learned about the internationally acclaimed schools of Reggio Emilia, Italy, while working at the University of Massachusetts in 1993. The Reggio Emilia approach to early childhood education inspires teachers to partner with children to discover, create, solve problems, and learn together.  Dotty's study of the Reggio Emilia approach includes attending numerous professional conferences, working with Amelia Gambetti, master teacher from 
Reggio Emilia, and visiting the schools of Reggio Emilia to learn more firsthand.





Dotty has presented at many national early education conferences and was invited to become a faculty member at the teachers college of Christchurch, New Zealand, while on sabbatical from UMass during the 1997-98 school year. She also provides workshops and professional development trainings on topics such designing engaging learning environments, developing meaningful co-constructivist curriculum, helping children learn through art, and using assessment and documentation to support learning. She is currently teaching a graduate class on Science Methods in Elementary Education, to masters degree students in the Pre-K through 2nd Grade public school certification program.

 

 

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